Wild Summer Skies

Looking southeast from South Bend

When I was out at Beaver Point just before sunset last night, I could see the clouds were really wild looking to the southeast, and I would get much better photos from the south bend about a quarter-mile downriver. I hightailed it south and along the way heard the owlets peeping in the cottonwoods between 4th of July Point and South Bend, but I could not see them. I got down to South Bend in time for some spectacularly wild clouds with the half-moon hanging behind them. On my way backed I looked for the owlets, but could not find them in the trees. There was still a lot of color in the clouds when I got to the Tangle Heart Tree, but the color had pretty much subsided to the east when I got to Shehanne’s tree on my way back home.

Looking east over the Rio Grande a the Sandias from South Bend.

A half-moon peaking through the Tangle-Heart Tree.

The last of the color looking north from the Tangle Heart Tree. Can you see a face in the clouds?

Shehanne’s Tree in front of a fading eastern sky.

 

52 thoughts on “Wild Summer Skies

  1. Wowow! I wanted to capture tonight’s but was not at the right place. Bummer
    Amazing shots and love the moon in the Tangle-Heart tree a and the face in the clouds ..
    Ace.

  2. I was scrolling down in your post and I immediately saw a face in that cloud, even before I read your words. Fanatic religious people would see something devoted I guess…
    Beautiful photographs, Tim!

  3. Those are all beautiful images, Tim, especially the first one and the tangleheart tree. I can see the face in the clouds, but it reminds me of the Grim Reaper. Our evenings have been clear enough up here lately I have not seen many spectacular skies like yours.

  4. Oh how I enjoyed this chase for the setting sun photos, marked by all the familiar landmarks. These photos are incredible…way to go capturing this incredible beauty, Timothy. Liked, too, that you heard the owlets but didn’t see them. I’m always surprised by how loudly baby owls call out, and really glad they are so camouflaged because they’re too easy an target with their volume. I have read so many sad and frightening accounts of Covid in the Rio Grande Valley lately, that it is actually very relieving to see this post with its stunning photos and happy moments. Stay safe, my friend.

    • Thanks, Jet. The owlets can be really load, but they blend into the cottonwoods so well that if there’s not some sky behind them they are almost impossible to see.

  5. Absolutely see the face. It looks like Moses or Plato or… some wise guy with a beard.
    Love that pic of Shey’s Tree. I will be using it, soon(ish). TY for sending it!

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