More Moon Madness

A clear dawn

The Rio Grande and Sandias at sunset last night.

The Rio Grande reflecting

Odd flower out. Echinacea in Brown-Eyed Susans

The moon on the left was taken with my iPhone through a telescope* at 11:00 pm last night. The moon on the right was taken with the Bazooka at 6:00 am this morning. Click on the photos to see the details.

An attempt to get Jupiter and its moons through a telescope with the iPhone*. It came out nicely abstract.

On the left are Jupiter and its moons taken at 11:30 pm last night. On the right are Jupiter and its moons taken at 6:00 am this morning. Both photos were taken with the Bazooka.

Jupiter taken with the Bazooka at 11:30 pm last night. You can almost see the patterns in Jupiter’s clouds.

Jupiter and the moon at 6:00 am this morning.

Saturn is at its peak opposition to the sun tonight. However, a storm rolled in, and the sky is overcast, so I am going to have to strike photographing Saturn tonight.

*I held my iPhone lenses to the eyepiece on the telescope. It’s difficult to align the correct lens and get a really good photo with three lenses on the iPhone. The moon came out pretty well. Jupiter was another matter.

Tourist

Pre-dawn

Dawn

Misty, a Mississippi Kite, is staying in Corrales for the summer.

We interrupt this post for a news flash. Søren has Tail Feathers! Yes! You heard it here first. Søren has tail feathers. For those of you who don’t know, Søren is our neurotic African Grey Parrot. Tristan and David got him around 2007. When Tristan and David divorced in 2014, Søren went crazy and pulled out all his feathers. We took Søren so he could live with a couple. He let all his feathers grow back, but he had been pulling out his tail feathers until a few weeks ago. Why he stopped pulling them out all of a sudden I can’t say, but he has figured out that he might be able to fly having all his feathers grown out. He finally looks like a whole African Grey Parrot.

Søren with his red tail feathers

The moon finally broke through the clouds for a bit last night.

Eye

Glenda

We had a doozy of a thunderstorm last night. While I was out photographing the lightning, the lightning took out my gigabit switch. I turned my NAS drives back on after the power came back on and stayed on afterand they couldn’t connect to the network. I finally figured out the switch wasn’t working. I dug out an older switch that solved the connection problem, but at 100MB/s it’s the connection is really slow. I ordered a new switch and a UPS backup to plug the switch and NAS drives into.

The lightning bolt in the fifth photo was so close that the flash and the boom were simultaneous, and then a torrent of rain came pouring down. I got under the cover of the deck, but the rain was blowing into the deck through the wire, so I finally went inside.

Glenda giving me dragon eyes.

Saturn At Opposition

Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and possibly Nunki seen on the righthand edge of the photo. I couldn’t find anything else that would be that bright to the right of Saturn in the charts.

What is Saturn opposed to? The sun, of course. On August 14th Saturn will be at its brightest. I’m hoping for a clear night.

These images of Saturn were taken through the night into the early morning hours using my Bazooka lens (Canon 400mm ƒ/4 DO) on a Canon 7D Mark II when I could see Saturn through breaks in the clouds.

The moon peeking out through a break in the clouds.

The moon finally broke free from the clouds.

Jupiter with three of its moons. I was surprised I got Neptune on the right.

Ku Koo

Rio Grande high*
Brontosaurus in the clouds
Redish mountains sigh

*I don’t write Haiku. I prefer “in the style of Haiku” or 575 or “Spunku” or “Timku” as some people have suggested because, in my personal opinion, since English is not a monosyllabic language, it creates issues for Haiku. The above poem is a good example: most English speakers pronounce “Grande” as “Grand” (one syllable) so the first line only has four syllables when “Grande” is pronounced as “Grand”. Therefore, an “is” would be needed as in “Rio Grande is high” to have five syllables in the first line. However, in Spanish “Grande” is pronounced “Grandae” making it two syllables. The first line has five syllables if “Grande” is pronounced as it is in Spanish (that’s how I pronounce it). Grande would have two syllables pronounced in Old English, also.

If the first line were “Rio Grande is high” (five syllables by the standard English pronunciation, six syllables in Spanish) the line is more descriptive of the water level in the Rio Grande when the photo was taken. However, by leaving out the verb in the first line, more ambiguity is introduced in the first line.

Three-thirty AM
You know where Jupiter is
Shining through the clouds

Dawn

Dusk

Moon behind clouds