Trees in the Snow

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Resa’s Tree

Snow has fallen most of the day. After I got home, I went out and photographed the trees on our property that have been claimed.

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Robin’s Tree
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Tiffany’s Tree? I don’t remember if Tiffany claimed this tree or not.
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Susan’s Tree
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Resa’s Tree from a different point of view
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Susan’s Tree from a different point of view
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Birds foraging in the snow
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Lyn’s Tree with Resa’s Tree in the back ground
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Black bamboo bowing low in the snow

61 thoughts on “Trees in the Snow

  1. Hi, Tim. Thanks for all the trees in snow. What was most amazing to me was the bamboo in the snow… I had no idea that was how it would look… 🙂

  2. Each tree has a stand and personality of their own. I often wonder about the probability that trees are much wiser and more enlightened than us. If only we could hear them speak, it would be something inspiring, I suspect.

      • Yes, I would. Thanks for asking. The bamboos are nice, humble and tenderhearted, I would like to bow back to them and ask for the permission to claim them as my friends.

      • Hi Dot. The bamboo stand is yours. The bamboo is Black Bamboo. It was very expensive when we bought a pot of it back in 2004. The nursery staff told us to plant it in the shade. We planted it in the shade of two large crabapple trees. The bamboo thrived under the trees. The trees were old and dying, so I took them out in 2009. Once the bamboo was exposed to full sun, it went wild. The stand is now large enough that I cut a maze inside it. It’s very invasive, but easy to control. The cats love to walk the maze and lie on the chairs we have in the maze. One can sit in the chairs in the middle of the bamboo stand and ponder life, the universe and black bamboo. Blue kitten would love it.

      • Thanks Tim. I am now a proud owner of such an impressive bamboo stand, how wonderful, Blue would love it as well! In Chinese culture, bamboo represents a life evergreen – its uncluttered interior implies an egoless quality; its low-bending yet never-breaking posture indicates a humble yet confident manner; the joints between its culms suggest faith and earnest. So Chinese people consider having bamboo thriving in your backyard a sign very auspicious – would definitely bring you good health and longevity 🐬

      • Hi Dot. I’m happy we have the bamboo so you could claim it. It’s amazing how it will bend so low covered with snow and then spring back upright after the snow melts or I knock it off.

  3. I always feel sorry for all the amputrees that get hacked all their lives in the vicinity of power lines. True stoics. Resa’s tree resists with amazing wild twists and turns.

    • Hi Bill. Cottonwoods grow quickly and are brittle, so they break in the wind, then they bend and gnarl as they grow in different directions after they the loss of limbs.

    • Thanks, Teagan. Do you want to claim a tree? The young cottonwood on the property is up for grabs and there are three other big, old cottonwoods on the property, but they are bit obscure. Then there is a bosque full of trees.

      • LOL, I always expect things to be more difficult and more complicated. I’d be honored to claim a tree. One of the old ones… because I’m big, old, and obscure! o_O I love big old trees.

      • Too late. I already photographed a set of trees and posted them for you. If you don’t like any of those, I’ll post more choices from the bosque tomorrow.

      • Sorry. I didn’t see a comments box. Wow they are all stunning. Such a difficult choice! Blue spruce has always seemed magical to me. Maybe because I rarely saw them as a child (Georgia being packed with white pines and cedars). I also love gnarly trees… Okay — I claim that pair of superbly gnarly old trees. That photo speaks to me. I even like the shed and the pickup truck. That photo begins a story in my head. Hugs!

      • Great choice, Teagan. Those Cottonwoods will be so happy. They often feel left out and a bit lonely stuck behind the shed while the other trees get all the photographic attention. Whenever you need photos of the trees let me know.

    • Thanks, Susan. We’ve had more snow in that last couple of years. We had several years with no snow before that.

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