9th Annual Corrales Rose Society Dr. Huey Tour

We had our 9th Annual Corrales Rose Society Dr. Huey Tour this afternoon after I went to a “hanging” to help Susan Graham hang her photos at the NM Cancer Center for a Gallery with A Cause show titled “On the Rise – Artists in Early and Mid-Career.” I also helped another artist hang her paintings. She was by herself. Susan and I discovered it’s hard to hang the art and get it right as per the curator who didn’t give particularly clear instructions. When I came out of the restroom after washing my hands, I noticed the artist was starting to rearrange her paintings after the curator had set them where she wanted the paintings. I told the artist not to change the order of her paintings or she would have to rehang them. After Susan and I were done hanging Susan’s photographs, and Susan was waiting for final approval, I noticed the artist having a little trouble hanging her paintings. I went down and helped her. It’s a two-person job to hang artwork and get everything aligned and spaced properly.

I had been to the Cancer Center a week ago for my annual checkup, but it turned out to be my last checkup. My doctor said the scan was clear and my immune system was almost up to normal numbers, so he fired me as a patient. No more scans or checkups unless I get symptoms.

For new followers, Dr. Huey is the rootstock used to graft roses in the western United States. Corrales is a cold spot. A lot of roses freeze at the bud unions in the winter killing the rose grafted to the rootstock. Dr. Huey is cold hardy and drought tolerant. Once the bud union is dead Dr. Huey grows. Therefore, there are many Dr. Hueys growing in Corrales. Starting in 2014, we had done an annual tour of Dr. Hueys in Corrales or simply on our property since we have more Dr. Hueys every year.

We have a lot more Dr. Hueys this year because we had a cold and very dry winter. I was not able to water much during the winter because it never warmed up enough for the hoses to thaw. So we lost more roses over the winter.

Most rosarians don’t like Dr. Huey, but Laurie, Susan, and I love Dr. Huey. It only blooms once, but when Dr. Huey blooms it produces a lot of beautiful red roses with yellow centers. While many of our other roses are struggling due to the drought, Dr. Huey is thriving. Rosarians who live in other parts of the country that don’t have harsh climates like New Mexico can be snobs and hate rootstock roses, but Laurie, Susan, and I appreciate any rose that can thrive in New Mexico, and Dr. Huey is thriving.

A large Dr. Huey along Corrales Road.

Well Hung

Thirteen of sixteen photos Susan has in the show.

Paul flew over to the trees between the ditches leaving Mary behind. Daddy owl was keeping an eye on Mary. We didn’t see Peter in the trees between the ditches, so we presume he flew over to the Bosque. We’ll have to go over and see if we can find him in the Bosque. Given the rate of growth and flying, the owlets might have each hatched a week apart.

The wind blew clouds through for a decent sunset.

Jake-In-The-Box

Venus, Jupiter, Mars, and Saturn among the star, shining through thin clouds and smoke.

A Jake-In-The-Box

Lizard

Western Bluebirds of happiness

Iris

Blue Iris

Mother’s Day roses: Neil Diamond looks like Scentimental. Anna’s Promise, and Vavoom.

Ketchup & Mustard and Vavoom.

Beaker

Søren

Ring around the moon

It’s half the moon it used to be!

STOP!

Søren. I know you tell the cats to “STOP” all the time and they don’t listen to you. What makes you think they can read?

Silver caught Cator Mortis from Loki. Glenda is the black cat in the foreground in the middle picture.

Sky views

Moon at sunset

Caw of the wild. I think this is a whiny juvenile crow.

These flowers grow from bulbs. They are like a cross between a Shasta Daisy and a sunflower.

A fine end to the day