Pearl Crescents

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Tiny Pearl Crescent butterflies enjoying our purple salvia.

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I compelled to do a pesky green red car report since my MX-5 is averaging 42.5 mpg (18.07 kpl) after driving 320.3 miles (515.47 kilometers). That’s the best average gas mileage so far, which included a lot of stop and go traffic (all the public schools and universities are back in session), plus I drove to three different schools in different parts of town on this tank of gas.

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Cosmos & Roses

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Can you find the Painted Lady butterflies?

Our cosmos have started to bloom, and the roses are putting on another round of blooms. The little white and green flowers in the second and third set of photos below are a wildflower that busts open like fireworks. It reminds me of dill, and the wasps and butterflies love it.

 

Clouded Colors

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The echinaceas are attracting the various colors of clouded sulfur butterflies: green, orange, yellow.

Green Clouded Sulfur (Colias philodice)

I was able to get the orange sulfur (Colias eurytheme), also known as the “alfalfa butterfly”, above with it’s wings open as it landed on an enchinacea. Clouded Sulfurs rarely open their wings to a flattened position when they are perched. The solid black around the edges of the wings indicate that this one is a male (females have dots on the black edges).

Backlit orange.

A male Orange fluttering around an unfazed female Green (the green has spots on the black edges of her wings).

Yellow Sulfer (Colias croceus).

 

 

Many Sides of a Buckeye Butterfly

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I was out digging up elm trees, pruning roses, and fixing one of the drip systems in the wee hours of the morning. While walking between my different tasks, I noticed a few Buckeye Butterflies feeding on the little morning glories growing in the mulch. I grabbed my camera, and followed one around as it flew from one morning glory to another.

It didn’t open its wings other than to fly or do quick flutters to catch its balance against a sudden breeze. I had to catch it in flight or while it was catching it’s balance to get photos of it with its wings open, so there is movement in some of the shots.

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Male Queen

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This is a male Queen Butterfly feeding on purple wildflowers in the bosque. You can tell he’s a male by the black, teardrop shaped spots on the lower inside of his wings that are pheromone scales. Unlike Monarch butterflies that don’t use pheromones to attract mates, the Queens do.

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