Turnip The Volume* & Groove To The Beet

Dolores and I finished cleaning up our old office space in Downtown Albuquerque this morning. The lease ends on Thursday. While the restaurant space below our office was vacant for the last five months of 2020 and the first 5 months of 2021, the ACRE • Comfort Vegetarian • restaurant started remodeling the space below our offices as we were moving the remainder of our staff out of the office in June. This is the second location for the ACRE. Owner Sean Weed planned to open in August, but the City dragged its feet on approving all the permits until last week. We saw Sean as we were getting ready to leave, and he told us he’s opening tomorrow morning, Monday, September 20, 2021. He invited us inside to see the restaurant. If you live or work in or near Downtown Albuquerque, the ACRE looks like it has excellent vegetarian and vegan dishes. If you look at their website, not only will you see clever puns like “Turnip The Volume”, “Flex Your Brussels”, and “Lettuce Serve You”, you will see creative and appetizing dishes listed on their menus at reasonable prices.

*One of the clever puns on the ACRE’s • Comfort Vegetarian • website: https://www.theacrerestaurant.com/press

William C. Winkler RIP

There are rebels and there are Rebels. William C. Winkler was a Rebel. Not one to raise hell or bring a lot of attention to himself, he was a refined Rebel who stood against pushes for change until he was convinced that change was needed, change was useful, and change was good. I was usually successful in getting William to see the light, but it was never easy. Willam passed away earlier this week at the age of 79.

William standing on the corner of 4th & Gold in Downtown Albuquerque

We hired William is 1994 as an architectural evaluator. He was 52 years old, and after the firm he had worked for either downsized or closed, he found himself out of work. He told me once he was really grateful that we hired him, because most firms would not consider him because he was over 40. William was an excellent staff member who turned out to be a great friend as well. William retired from ARC in 2016 after 22 years.

WCW at his retirement party. He was a Green Bay Packers fan and a Wisconsin “Cheese Head”.

Besides his interest in architecture, he was interested in music, photography, and technology, so he and I had a lot in common. I had been playing flamenco guitar for a couple of years when William started working at ARC, and he was the one who told me I needed a stage name. One day he said “You need a stage name like that Chuscales* character! What’s Spanish for ‘curmudgeon’?” I went home that night and asked one of our Cuban friends what a curmudgeon was in Cuban Spanish. He said there’s “El Cheo”. The next day I asked WCW what he thought of “El Cheo”, he approved and my stage name has been El Cheo ever since. He usually called me “El” after that and I called him “WCW” and “Veelhyme”. He refused to tell us what the “C” stood for.

William Reflecting

When we moved to Spain in 1996, William and I had weekly correspondence that ended up becoming newsletters of the goings on in Spain from my perspective, and the goings on back home and at the office from William’s perspective. William called his newsletter “El Reporto” which was good Spanglish. My newsletter was “La Crónica…” with whatever the word of the week was that I put after Crónica. We always had a bit of competition to see who could come up with the most creative ways of describing our lives and the current situations in Spain and New Mexico. Here’s an excerpt from a 6,000 word letter I wrote to William in October 1996:

“Believe me, flamenco lore is so full of romanticism about gypsy origins, myths, fabricated histories and downright lies that it is hard to tell fact from fiction.”

We often had discussions on the history and origins of flamenco. I signed the letter

“Until next time,

El Cheo Stecchino Andante”

Unfortunately, I don’t have an example from “El Reporto” because we didn’t have email in Spain, so all our correspondence was printed and mailed back and forth using the postal services. I have William’s “El Reportos” boxed up and stored somewhere in the infinite shed of doom.

Willam had a tie to Spain, as well. His sister-in-law, Catherine, was a professor of Catalan Feminist Literature. Not only did Catherine and her husband visit us in Madrid, but we went down to Valencia and stayed in their condo on the beach one weekend.

WCW trying out the racing bike I put together for him.

William was a smoker, so we would go out on walks so he could take a smoke break. I got a lot of photos from around downtown while walking with William. After Bruce joined ARC in 2008, William, Bruce and I would go out for walks and break all the rules about smoking where we were not supposed to smoke. Neither Bruce nor I smoke, but it was fun acting like we did simply to break rules and be annoying.

Checking out the snow.

For years I didn’t work on Fridays. One Friday when Ben was working for me, he and Bruce and Ben’s brother, who was in town visiting, made a Parkour video at our office. William makes an involuntary cameo and he became the star of the video.

One thing I always appreciated about William is that he was always brutally honest. I started producing my bloody awful parodies after William retired. I would send them to him to get his opinion. Like Lewis Winn, who is my guitar guru, Willian had no qualms about telling me exactly what he thought about my parodies — “bloody awful” on most accounts. However, like Lewis, he appreciated the humor and silliness, and always asked for more. William actually liked “Bite ‘Em on the old Shin Bone”, and “Coyotes” (an original piece). The twangy guitar in “Coyotes” reminded him of “Apache” by the Shadows. He asked me to make a parody of “Apache”. This one puzzled me, as I have no idea how to parody an instrumental piece other than do a bad job of playing it. Which would be very easy for me to do. I asked him what he wanted me to do with it, but I never got a definitive answer. I believe he just wanted to hear me play it. Sadly I never tried to play it let alone record it for him.

I hadn’t seen William in person since before the pandemic. We kept up a regular email correspondence and the last email exchanges I had with William were at the beginning of April about our new office building.

I’m going to miss William. There are few Rebels like William left in the world.

*Chuscales was a gypsy guitarist playing on the local flamenco scene back then.

On the Verizon

The hole and sono tube that will go into the hole in front of Model Shoe Shine Parlor.

A Verizon cell tower is on the horizon where a streetlight used to stand in front of Model Shoe Shine Parlor two doors west of our office in downtown Albuquerque. Contractors removed the streetlight, pulled up the bricks in the sidewalk, dug a deep hole, put a 36 inch by about 12 feet long sono tube (concrete form) into the hole with rebar and conduit for wiring, and filled the sono tube with concrete. I did not have time to go out and get photos of the sono tube filled with concrete. One worker told me it took three yards of concrete to fill the sono tube. It takes a deep foundation to support a cell tower.

Sono tube in the ground with a lot of conduit for wiring.

A peek deep into the soon tube full of rebar, wires, and conduit ready to be filled with concrete.

Dumpster Burn

There was a dumpster burning when I walked to my car to head home.

The fireman aimed the water gun at the burning dumpster.

The water would not fire on the fire.

Down to a dribble. I sympathize with the poor old pumper.

Meanwhile, on the other side of the firetruck, the other firemen had hooked up a hose to a hydrant and started whizzing on the blaze.

Smoke billowed from the dumpster as the whizzing water doused the flames.

Policemen checked out the progress of the dumpster burn.

Persistence of Pigeons Parking

Every morning during the week I park my car in the same spot as I am usually first to arrive in the parking lot. Recently, when I get out of the car, pigeons fly in and gather around me. Last week three or four would gather, but this morning 14 pigeons flew in and stood in front of me. I assume they are expecting a handout like most people I encounter early in the morning downtown. Since I had nothing to offer them other than a few words of encouragement, like Saint Frances of Assisi, I gave them a short sermon. Then I gathered my things out of the trunk of my car and headed to the office.

Fourteen pigeons hoping for a handout got a short sermon instead.

Makes Sense

The old Kress building that has been available for lease for at least 30 years got all its beautiful curved glass windows broken in last summer’s riots and was boarded up until recently. The boards were taken down, new glass installed, some of the artwork that was painted on the boards put in the windows, and the City of Albuquerque post a substandard unsafe to occupy sign on the door. Makes a lot of sense.

The new glass looks great.

The unsafe interior of the ground floor. Bruce and I think that space would make a great place for ballroom dance.

Snow Came and Went

Black and white of snow under dawn’s dark light turns to snow black and white under a dark street light.

Cranes fly into darkness in the sun’s waning light.

Clouds break up over the Rio Grande and the snow-covered Sandias.

Mama Owl and Daddy Owl perched in a different tree.

Crows fly in the final light of dusk.

The pTerodactyl reflects in the darkness.

Divine Dumpster

Wishful thinking for Downtown Albuquerque.

No moon this morning. It was hiding behind the clouds at dawn.

I attended a meeting about a conservation project in north Corrales where runoff and treated wastewater from Rio Rancho dumps into the Rio Grande. The Nature Conservancy is working with various agencies to use the runoff and wastewater to retore the area into a wetland. Therefore, I did not get out to say hi to the owls and cranes tonight.